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Ongoing Excavation Works.

Please be aware that there are extensive ongoing excavation works around the Observatory until after Christmas. Please be very careful driving over the moat and note that parking may be difficult. We are, however, open for business and welcome anyone interested in winter birding around Dungeness.

2nd May

A few notable birds were seen on the land with at least two singing Wood Warblers, 30 Willow Warblers, a "continental" Coal Tit, a Jay and a Tree Pipit of note. A Red Kite, at least four Buzzards, two Hobbies, 30 Swallows and six Yellow Wagtails flew over. A female Pheasant was also seen.
It was generally quiet offshore but five hours of watching produced three Eiders, a Black-throated Diver, a Great Northern Diver, 21 Whimbrel, three Little Terns, two Great Skuas and four Arctic Skuas of note.
Six Porpoise were feeding offshore. A "large" bat species came in off the sea.

Butterflies provided plenty of interest today with a male Orange-tip in the trapping area and the first Brown Argus of the spring being seen. The first dragonflies have also started to appear with Azure Damselfly and several Hairy Dragonfly being found.

Also of great interest was the finding of the very rare beetle Hister quadrimaculatus in the moat. As far as I know this is the fourth British record of this beetle with three of these coming from within 200metres of each other at Dungeness.

Hister quadrimaculatus   Dungeness   2nd May 2019 (Paul Hogben)