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Due to Coronavirus we will have to remain closed to visitors for the foreseeable future. The Dungeness Estate is presently closed to non-residents so access is not available. We are still operating our monitoring programme.

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The Trustees.

21st Jan

After a night of violent storms which resulted in more tiles blowing off the roof it continued very wet and windy for most of the day. A couple of seawatches produced four Velvet Scoters and 140 Common Scoters passing to the west. Although there was no Patch there were hundreds of gulls feeding along the shoreline with the regular Iceland Gull still present along with a first-winter Caspian Gull and two Yellow-legged Gulls.

20th Jan

Very little coverage in awful weather although a Velvet Scoter was of note on the morning seawatch.

19th Jan

Not a great deal to be seen on a mostly miserable day. 

18th Jan

The usual second-year Iceland Gull and a first-winter Caspian Gull were among large numbers of gulls feeding at the Patch and the Grey Wagtail was inside the Power Station again. A couple of seawatches produced over 2000 auks moving west.  A Woodcock flew inland past the Observatory this afternoon.

A Porpoise was feeding offshore.

Also received a nice ringing recovery from the BTO today. A Lesser Redpoll ringed at the Observatory on 2nd November 2018 was captured by another ringer (controlled) at Omdal, Sokndal, Rogaland, Norway on 11th September 2020. 


17th Jan

A nice day for a change. An early-morning seawatch produced 278 Red-throated Divers, 98 Gannets and four Mediterranean Gulls passing west and a visit to the Patch found the second-year Iceland Gull still present along with a first-winter Caspian Gull and two Mediterranean Gulls. The superb male Black Redstart and the Grey Wagtail were feeding around the Sewage Treatment unit were showing again. Firecrests were seen in the Observatory Garden and along with a Chiffchaff in the trapping area. A Buzzard was hunting over the area.





Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides    Dungeness   17th January 2021

A Common Seal was also feeding at the Patch.

16th Jan

Another miserable, cold, wet and windy day. Coverage limited to the sea again but very quiet here except for a Velvet Scoter, good numbers of auks and a few Kittiwakes.

15th Jan

After two days of miserable weather it was a bit better today and allowed for some coverage. An early morning seawatch did not produce a great deal in the way of movement there was a large feeding flock offshore which included three Mediterranean Gulls and three Caspian Gulls. Three Firecrests were of note on the land. 

A Grey Seal was also seen.

13th Jan

A really miserable day of almost constant light rain and fog meant for little coverage but plenty of paperwork. A brief, slightly clearer spell of weather in late afternoon allowed a quick check of the Patch where the second-year Iceland Gull was still present and the smart male Black Redstart and Grey Wagtail were feeding around the sewage treatment unit again.

A Common Seal and a Grey Seal were feeding offshore.

12th Jan

A morning seawatch produced 340 Gannets, a Fulmar, 126 Kittiwakes, seven Mediterranean Gulls and 1250 auks, all west. A check of the Patch this afternoon showed the second-year Iceland Gull still present, a first-winter Caspian Gull and another five Mediterranean Gulls. A superb male Black Redstart was feeding around the sewage treatment works inside the power station and whilst I was checking the Pied Wagtail roost (135 birds) a Woodcock came in off the sea. 

11th Jan

A couple of hours seawatching this morning produced 14 Teal, four Velvet Scoters, 50 Kittiwakes, a Mediterranean Gull and 1500 auks species. A quick throw of some bread attracted just a handful of gulls but they did include a fourth-winter Caspian Gull and the regular Polish colour-ringed Black-headed Gull. In addition a first-winter gull came in which may have been a hybrid Caspian x Herring Gull rather than a pure Caspian Gull.



Caspian Gull Larus cachinnans   fourth-winter   Dungeness   11th January 2021



Caspian or hybrid Caspian x Herring Gull   first-winter   Dungeness   11th January 2021
First picked up on call as it flew into the flock I thought this was a Caspian Gull and most of the plumage looks ok for this species but the head looks quite streaked and the overall structure does not feel quite right.

Black-headed Gull Chroicocephalus ridibundus   adult   Dungeness   11th January 2021
A frequently recorded Polish colour-ringed bird.